Hamlet 1

Ophelia

HAMLET

By William Shakespeare
Directed by Stan Barber
Fight Direction by David Dean Hastings
Trilogy Theatre, NYC

“Cynthia Enfield's performance of Ophelia in HAMLET was among the finest performances that I have ever had the good fortune to see. Haunting and breathtaking, she astonished me and left me in tears.”

—OWEN THOMPSON, Artistic Director, Protean Theatre Co, NYC

“Cynthia Enfield has delighted me and my family with her performances for Castle Shakespeare Repertory Co. We very much enjoyed her Juliet and Ophelia. She must take great pleasure and satisfaction in her profession and the enjoyment she brings to it. We look forward to seeing her on stage in the future. Stan Barber is to be commended for the talent he has attracted, such as Cynthia's, to his theatre company.”

—CARL WRONKO, Theatergoer

And let me speak to th’yet unknowing world
How these things came about. So shall you hear
Of carnal, bloody, and unnatural acts,
Of accidental judgments, casual slaughters,
Of deaths put on by cunning and forc’d cause,
And, in this upshot, purposes mistook
Fall’n on th’inventors’ heads. All this can I
Truly deliver.

—Horatio, HAMLET, ACT V, SC. II

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Trojan Women 1

Andromache

THE TROJAN WOMEN

By Euripides
Directed by Johanna Johannson
The Theatre Space @ Holy Trinity

“I've watched as Cynthia Enfield tore up the classical stage with her portrayals of Andromache in THE TROJAN WOMEN and of Lady M. in the Scottish play [MACBETH]. Cynthia is an enormous talent. She brings a great intelligence to her approach to a role, showing us all aspects of the character: cerebral, sensual, visceral, and romantic.”

—LEWIS CHAMBERS, Agent, The Bethel Agency, NYC


The Trojan Women presents the tragic condition of the Trojan Women when the men have been killed by the Greeks and they are at the mercy of their captors. One of these ill-fated women is Andromache. First, she witnesses the brutal death of her husband. Then she learns she is to be given, as a prize, to the son of her husband's murderer, while her own son is carried off to his death by order of the Greeks.

Go now and die by our cruel enemies hands.
There is nothing more that I can do. Your
father’s greatness flowered and for that simple
fact they kill you. Helen you are not Zeus’
daughter, but Greece’s curse and with those
eyes you brought shame and ruin to all!

—Andromache, THE TROJAN WOMEN

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Romeo And Juliet 1

Juliet

ROMEO AND JULIET

By William Shakespeare
Directed by Stan Barber
Fight Direction by David Dean Hastings
Castle Shakespeare Repertory, NJ

“Cynthia Enfield has delighted me and my family with her performances for Castle Shakespeare Repertory Co. We very much enjoyed her Juliet and Ophelia. She must take great pleasure and satisfaction in her profession and the enjoyment she brings to it. We look forward to seeing her on stage in the future. Stan Barber is to be commended for the talent he has attracted, such as Cynthia's, to his theatre company.”

—CARL WRONKO, Theatergoer


Two households both alike in dignity
(in fair Verona, where we lay our scene)
From ancient grudge break to new mutiny
Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.
From forth the fatal loins of these two foes
A pair of star cross’d lovers take their life,
Whose misadventur’d piteous overthrows
Doth with their death bury their parents strife.

—Chorus, ROMEO AND JULIET, ACT I, SC I

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Doctor 1

Lucinde

THE DOCTOR IN SPITE OF HIMSELF

By Moliere
Adapted by Owen Thompson
Directed by Owen Thompson
Protean Theatre Company, NYC
The Davenport Theatre, NYC

“Cynthia Enfield’s beautifully expressive face was worth a thousand words as the mostly mute Lucinde.”

“The Protean Theatre has established a fine reputation for giving lost or lesser-known classics professional New York productions. [Protean is] blessed with an exceptional ensemble…”

—JULIE HALPERN, www.oobr.com


“This ribald comedy fares quite well in the hands of this feisty theatrical troupe…”

—Dolores Whiskeyman, Curtain Up


In my play of 1667, “THE DOCTOR IN SPITE OF HIMSELF”,
I decided that I’d had enough of the church for a while, and
that I would turn my attentions toward a villain for whom
everyone seems to hold a mutual sense of loathing: the
Doctor. I have found the process of denigrating the medical
profession to be utterly rewarding, and have begun work on
yet another doctor-play which will be opening soon. In this
instance, however, my character, whose name is
Sganarelle!...is nothing but a peasant wood cutter who, amid
a series of misunderstandings, finds himself being elevated to
the role of doctor. He finds that he rather enjoys the process
of dispensing medical advice at random, and giving
impromptu examinations to nubile young ladies. His
assignment, however, is to examine the daughter [Lucinde] of
a nobleman, who is trying to marry the girl off to a rich
gentleman, while the daughter has other ideas. As such, she
has feigned a sudden inability to speak, and the rich fiancé
refuses to marry her until she can speak again. Which always
struck me as looking a gift horse in the mouth, as it
were. A dumb wife seems to me a double blessing, and the more fool
he who fails to recognize that fact.

—Molière

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Othello 1

Desdemona

OTHELLO

By William Shakespeare
Directed by Melody Brooks
Fight Direction by David Dean Hastings
New Perspectives Theatre Company
Pelican Studio Theatre, NYC

My mother had a maid call’d Barbara
She was in love; and he she lov’d prov’d mad,
And did forsake her: she had a song of Willow,
An old thing ‘twas, but it express’d her fortune,
And she died singing it: that song to-night
Will not go from my mind; I have much to do,
But to go hang my head all at one side,
And sing it like poor Barbara.

—Desdemona, OTHELLO, Act IV, SC III

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Macbeth 1

Lady Macbeth

MACBETH

By William Shakespeare
Directed by Stan Barber
Fight Direction by James Karcher
Castle Shakespeare Repertory, NJ

“I've watched as Cynthia Enfield tore up the classical stage with her portrayals of Andromache in THE TROJAN WOMEN and of Lady M. in the Scottish play [MACBETH]. Cynthia is an enormous talent. She brings a great intelligence to her approach to a role, showing us all aspects of the character: cerebral, sensual, visceral, and romantic.”

—LEWIS CHAMBERS, Agent, The Bethel Agency, NYC

Glamis thou art, and Cawder; and shalt be
What thou art promis’d.—Yet do I fear thy nature:
It is too full o’th’milk of human kindness,
To catch the nearest way. Thou wouldst be great;
Art not without ambition, but without
The illness should arttend it:
Hie thee hither,
That I may pour my spirits in thine ear,
And chastise with the valour of my tongue
All that impedes thee from the golden round,
Which fate and metaphysical aid doth seem
To have thee crown’d withal.

—Lady Macbeth, MACBETH, Act I, SC V

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Shakespeare For Two 1

Shakespeare's
Leading Ladies

SHAKESPEARE FOR TWO
A duet of dueling and desire

By William Shakespeare
Conceived and Created by James Karcher with Cynthia Enfield
Directed by James Karcher
Fight Direction by James Karcher
Rogues Company, NYC
Westminster Arts Center, NJ
Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival(Onatru), NY

The Taming of the Shrew
Romeo and Juliet
A Midsummer Night’s Dream
Much Ado About Nothing
Hamlet
Macbeth
Henry V

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Mask Picture

Phillippe
17c. Rapier-wielding French Boy

DUELISTS THE FORGOTTEN CHAMPIONS

Created by Rod Kinter, and Joseph Travers
Written, Directed and Fights Choreographed by
John Bellomo, Rod Kinter, Ricki G. Ravitts,
Jim Robinson and Joseph Travers
Theater Ten Ten, NYC


This historically based drama chronicles famous duels from the first recorded duel until the last recorded duel. These fascinating real life stories span the 12th century through the 20th century and are supported by period costumes and weaponry and fight choreography by some of the Society of American Fight Director's most highly acclaimed fight directors.

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Poe 1

The Madman
and Poe's Loves

THE LIFE, LOVES, AND TALES OF TERROR OF
EDGAR ALLAN POE

By Edgar Allan Poe
Adapted by Kathryn Schultz Miller, Robert Lanier,
Steven Berkoff and Stan Barber
Directed by Stan Barber
Commedia and Dance Choreography by Jacqueline Testa-Jerndal
Castle Shakespeare Repertory, NJ


Edgar Allan Poe's extraordinary and tragic life is presented alongside his work. We see how his troubled past deeply influenced his writing and created in him, a passion for the macabre.

How, then, am I mad? Hearken!
and observe how healthily—how calmly
I can tell you the whole story. It is impossible
to say how first the idea entered my brain;
but once conceived it haunted me day and night.
Object there was none. Passion there was none.
I loved the old man. He had never wronged me.
He had never given me insult. For his gold
I had no desire. I think it was his eye! yes,
it was this! One of his eyes resembled that of a vulture—
a pale blue eye, with a film over it.
Whenever it fell upon me, my blood ran cold;
and so by degrees—very gradually—
I made up my mind to take the life of the old man,
and thus rid myself of the eye forever.

—The Madman, THE TELL-TALE HEART

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Mask Picture

Belle, Charwoman
and Martha Cratchit

A CHRISTMAS CAROL

By Charles Dickens
Adapted by Michael Paller
Directed by Eric Hafen
Park Performing Arts Center, NJ

I have endeavoured in this Ghostly little book,
to raise the Ghost of an Idea, which shall not
put my readers out of humour with themselves,
with each other, with the season, or with me.
May it haunt their houses pleasantly, and no
one wish to lay it.


Their faithful Friend and Servant,
C. D. [Charles Dickens]
December, 1843.

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The Lion In Winter 1

Princess Alais

THE LION IN WINTER

By James Goldman
Directed by Christopher LeCrenn
Rabbit in the Moon Theatre Company, NYC

“Cynthia Enfield as the Princess Alais is very good at scheming to feather her own nest, she gains our sympathy when she collapses, sobbing in Eleanor’s lap.”

—RUTH ROSS, Theater Review


It is Christmas of 1183, and Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine are, for once, together in the drafty castle at Chinon. For all their regal status, they are much like any long-estranged but inseparably married couple: Henry flaunts his new mistress [Princess Alais]; Eleanor plots against him with their sons. They will do anything they can to hurt each other. And they love each other to distraction.

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The Tales Of Robin Hood 1

Maid Marian

THE TALES OF ROBIN HOOD

By Dan O’Driscoll
Directed by Dan O’Driscoll and Jim Robinson
Fight Direction by Dan O’Driscoll
New York Renaissance Faire, The Sterling Forest


Robin Hood is a courteous, pious and swashbuckling outlaw of the medieval era who robs from the rich to feed the poor. Robin Hood's partner and true love is Maid Marian. They, together with fellow outlawed yeoman, 'The Merry Men', fight against the injustices and tyranny of The Sheriff of Nottingham and Sir Guy of Gisborne.

A bonny fine maid of noble degree,
   With a hey down down a down down
      Maid Marian calld by name,
Did live in the North, of excellent worth,
   For she was a gallant dame.

For favour and face, and beauty most rare
   Queen Hellen shee did excell;
For Marian then was praisd of all men
   That did in the country dwell.

'Twas neither Rosamond nor Jane Shore,
   Whose beauty was clear and bright,
That could surpass this country lass,
   Beloved of lord and knight.

The Earl of Huntington, nobly born,
   That came of noble blood,
To Marian went, with a good intent,
   By the name of Robin Hood.

With kisses sweet their red lips meet,
   For shee and the earl did agree;
In every place, they kindly imbrace
   With love and sweet unity.

—Excerpt from ROBIN HOOD AND MAID MARIAN,
    No. 150 by Francis J. Child, 1888

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